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Personal Injury Newsletters

Federal Jurisdiction in Recreational Boating Accidents

When a recreational boating accident occurs, the first determination that must be made is whether a federal court or a state court has jurisdiction over a lawsuit that is filed with regard to the accident.

Federal Tort Claims Act – Discretionary Function Exception

The Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) bars claims that are based on the performance or failure to perform a discretionary function or duty of a federal agency or federal government employee, even if there is an abuse of discretion. According to this “discretionary function exception,” a personal injury action cannot be filed under the FTCA if the employee’s negligence arises from a discretionary function or the execution of a statute or regulation.

Federal Tort Claims Act — Federal Government Employees

The Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) applies to claims for personal injury caused by the negligence of a federal government employee who is acting within the scope of his or her employment, under circumstances where a private person would be liable under state law. Therefore, the FTCA applies only to personal injury actions that arise from the negligence of a federal government employee.

Federal Tort Claims Act — Scope of Employment

The Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) applies to claims for personal injury caused by the negligence of a federal government employee who is acting within the scope of his or her employment, under circumstances where a private person would be liable under state law. Therefore, in order for the FTCA to apply, the employee’s negligence must occur within the scope of his or her employment. Generally, a federal government employee is acting within the scope of his or her employment if the employee is engaged in an authorized activity that serves a governmental purpose.

Publication of a Defamation

A lawsuit for defamation has the following basic elements: (1) making a false statement; (2) about a person; (3) to others; and (4) actual damages (if the harm to the person is not apparent). There is a fifth element when the person is a public official or public figure. The person who made the statement has to have made it with a known or reckless disregard of the truth. This article discusses the third element, making a statement to others, known as publication.